sustainability

U of M hosts Turtle Island Indigenous Science Conference

Cultural traditions and language shape the ways people learn and view the world. For too long, Indigenous perspectives and traditional knowledge have been excluded from scientific discussions. Professors at the University of Manitoba have organized the upcoming Turtle Island Indigenous Science Conference to explore the legacy of Indigenous contributions to science.


Addressing global warming means socializing housing

The climate crisis may be the best reason for socializing housing. Winnipeg must look beyond traditional market strategies to address these issues together and reduce inequality. This means the city must take it upon itself to build affordable and climate-friendly housing for low-income earners in high-density neighbourhoods. Going forward, housing cannot have space for profit.


Suzuki’s keynote hit the right chords

Where many politicians refuse to denounce out-of-control economic growth and inequality as the main factor contributing to global warming, Suzuki expresses important anti-capitalist principles in his activism.


Scientists find oil rig noise pollution affects birds

We need to rethink the way we regulate noise pollution from oil rigs as the noise from oil drilling can be harmful to prairie songbirds, including species that are at risk. These findings come from a new study authored by Nicola Koper and Patricia Rosa. Koper is a professor at the natural resources institute at the University of Manitoba and Rosa is an assistant professor at St. George’s University. They both study how human activity can interfere with songbird behaviour. 


Sustainability week to focus on greenwashing

UMSU’s annual series of sustainability initiatives will be held March 1 through March 10 and will focus on the theme of
greenwashing, the process through which an organization misrepresents itself or its products as environmentally sustainable.
The events — dubbed sustainabilty season — will promote environmental sustainability and feature David Suzuki as the keynote
speaker.


Climate change goals must reduce greenhouse gas

A valuable tool for those who seek to blur the lines of necessary action is to obfuscate terms. Today, people confront a variety of terms with distinct meanings under the umbrella of environmental concern daily. Under this umbrella, policies seeking to reduce the amount of plastic in the ocean, fossil fuels used by consumers and the protection of green spaces are all given equal merit. While all of these goals are noble, our current emergency requires us to examine, prioritize and institute specific actions to counter human-caused climate change.


U of M explores alternatives to natural gas

The University of Manitoba has announced plans to reduce its reliance on natural gas in an effort to curb greenhouse gas emissions. Kale Kostick, projects coordinator for the U of M Office of Sustainability, said long-term plans are being explored for alternatives to natural gas to heat buildings.


Fishers are not the cause of Lake Winnipeg’s condition

Historically, Manitoba has treated Lake Winnipeg as a sink for resources, citing the lake’s economic value as motivation to maintain its ecological integrity. But this approach means sustaining the bare minimum of environmental standards to ensure its supposed value does not diminish. The result of this approach is a policy of perpetual catch-up — pollute as you go and fix the problem later. That is exactly what the PCs are doing when they blame the sustainability practices of fishers for the lake’s pollution and utter humble praises for Manitoba Hydro in the same speech.



Sustainability month goes virtual

The U of M’s office of sustainability has been thriving in an online setting thanks to social media. With October being sustainability month, the U…